New Sermon Series: Isaiah

This Lord’s Day, May 1, 2011, we begin a new series, this time from the Old Testament book of Isaiah.

Why study a book about events many centuries ago (8th-6th century B.C.), in lands far, far away, with cultures, languages, and societies so different from ours (ancient Near East)? What relevance could this large book (66 chapters) possibly have for us in the 21st century?

Find out in these next several months. Below is an outline of the book from the ESV Study Bible.

Outline

  1. Introduction: “Ah, Sinful Nation!” (1:1–5:30)
    1. Judah’s sins confronted (1:1–31)
    2. Judah’s hope, guilt, hope (2:1–4:6)
      1. Hope (2:1–5)
      2. Guilt (2:6–4:1)
      3. Hope (4:2–6)
    3. Judah’s sins condemned (5:1–30)
  2. God Redefines the Future of His People: “Your Guilt Is Taken Away” (6:1–12:6)
    1. Grace—through judgment—for Isaiah (6:1–13)
    2. Grace—through judgment—for Judah (7:1–9:7)
    3. Grace—through judgment—for Israel (9:8–11:16)
    4. The enjoyment of God’s grace (12:1–6)
  3. God’s Judgment and Grace for the World: “We Have a Strong City” (13:1–27:13)
    1. First series of oracles: the here and now (13:1–20:6)
      1. Babylon (13:1–14:27)
      2. Philistia (14:28–32)
      3. Moab (15:1–16:14)
      4. The Syria-Israel alliance (17:1–18:7)
      5. Egypt (19:1–20:6)
    2. Second series of oracles: the deeper truth (21:1–23:18)
      1. Babylon (21:1–10)
      2. Edom (21:11–12)
      3. Arabia (21:13–17)
      4. Jerusalem (22:1–25)
      5. Tyre (23:1–18)
    3. Third series of oracles: the final end (24:1–27:13)
      1. The wasted city (24:1–20)
      2. The Lord will punish (24:21–23)
      3. He will swallow up death forever (25:1–12)
      4. He will ordain peace (26:1–21)
      5. The whole world will be fruitful (27:1–13)
  4. God’s Sovereign Word Spoken into the World: “Ah!” (28:1–35:10)
    1. Six laments, with assurances (28:1–33:24)
      1. The proud crown of Ephraim (28:1–29)
      2. The city where David encamped (29:1–14)
      3. Those who turn things upside down (29:15–24)
      4. Stubborn children with their own plans (30:1–33)
      5. Those who go down to Egypt for help (31:1–32:20)
      6. The destroyer who has not been destroyed (33:1–24)
      7. Two final outcomes: judgment or salvation (34:1–35:10)
  5. Historical Transition: “In Whom Do You Now Trust?” (36:1–39:8)
    1. Practical trust in God vindicated (36:1–37:38)
    2. Human inconstancy sent into exile (38:1–39:8)
  6. Comfort for God’s Exiles: “The Glory of the Lord Shall Be Revealed” (40:1–55:13)
    1. The God of glory: his coming, exclusivity, power (40:1–31)
    2. The one true God moving history for his people (41:1–20)
    3. False hopes, the Lord’s servant, a new song (41:21–42:17)
    4. God reclaims his people for his glory (42:18–43:21)
    5. God revives his people for his glory (43:22–44:23)
    6. God predicts his use of Cyrus (44:24–45:25)
    7. The gods and pride of Babylon doomed (46:1–47:15)
    8. God will free his people from Babylon for his own sake (48:1–22)
    9. The Lord’s servant displayed, his people assured (49:1–50:3)
    10. The Lord’s servant taught, his people attentive (50:4–51:8)
    11. Encouragements to a responsive faith (51:9–52:12)
    12. The Lord’s servant: the exalted sin-bearer (52:13–53:12)
    13. Compassion for God’s people, offered to all (54:1–55:13)
  7. How to Prepare for the Coming Glory: “Hold Fast My Covenant” (56:1–66:24)
    1. The true people of God redefined (56:1–8)
    2. The false people of God exposed (56:9–57:13)
    3. The true people of God invited (57:14–21)
    4. The path to blessing: ritual vs. responsibility (58:1–59:13)
    5. Present failure, eternal covenant, future glory (59:14–60:22)
    6. The anointed Preacher renewing the world (61:1–62:12)
    7. The coming Victor; his past faithfulness (63:1–14)
    8. Praying for the power of God (63:15–64:12)
    9. The eagerness of God for his people’s eternal joy (65:1–25)
    10. True worship now and forever (66:1–24)
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