“Religion in America is, indeed, 3,000 miles wide and only three inches deep” – Dr. D. Michael Lindsay, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Assistant Director, Center on Race, Religion, and Urban Life, Rice University.

A survey released Monday by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life concludes that America is a nation of believers, but what exactly they believe in is not clear. A whopping 57 percent of evangelicals say they believe that Christianity is not the only way to eternal life, a stark contrast to what the Bible teaches (1 Tim 2:5; John 14:6; John 20:31; Acts 4:12).

What’s more distressing is that the percentage of Muslims who have the same pluralistic view is almost the same (56). Even more depressing is that the percentage of mainline Protestants (83) and Roman Catholics (79) almost equal the percentage of Buddhists (86) and Hindus (89) with the same view. New Age Eastern religions are right, “Resistance is futile; you will be assimilated.”

Pew Research TableThis finding underscores the many ills of evangelicalism: Biblical illiteracy and low regard for Scripture, religious pluralism and tolerance, or just plain rebellion against Scriptural truths.

This ignorance of and disregard for Biblical truth lead to a very low view of church membership, as Father Thomas Williams, professor of theology, says, “I think that organized religion could find this also a little bit threatening in the sense when dogma and doctrine become less and less important, it doesn’t matter belonging to one church or another.

Evangelicals: 3,000 miles wide, 3 inches deep

One thought on “Evangelicals: 3,000 miles wide, 3 inches deep

  • June 24, 2008 at 10:30 pm
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    “This finding underscores the many ills of evangelicalism: Biblical illiteracy and low regard for Scripture, religious pluralism and tolerance, or just plain rebellion against Scriptural truths.”

    I agree with most of that description, but I want to expand on the idea of tolerance. In today’s world tolerance no longer means to merely put up with, but it means acceptance. In this case, it means accepting another’s religious views as valid and “equally right” as one’s own. I really wish we would go back to the original definition of tolerance as respectfully allowing another person to hold different views, but still contending those views to be wrong.

    Another problem that this study illuminates is logic, or the lack thereof. Since we’ve stopped teaching children logical reasoning skills in school, our society no longer sees the inherent contradiction in holding that several religions may all be right.

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